Former OPCW Official: No Conclusive Proof of Russian Complicity in Salisbury Attack

But Russia’s denial of past ‘Novichok’ programmes is misleading.

Police officers guard a cordon around a police tent covering a supermarket car park pay machine near the spot where former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter were found critically ill following exposure to the Russian-developed nerve agent Novichok in Salisbury, England, Tuesday, March 13, 2018. The use of Russian-developed nerve agent Novichok to poison ex-spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter makes it "highly likely" that Russia was involved, British Prime Minister Theresa May said Monday. Novichok refers to a class of nerve agents developed in the Soviet Union near the end of the Cold War. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

The US and its European allies have coordinated the largest collective expulsion of Russian diplomats in history. Russia has promised to retaliate in kind. Yet despite the sense of certainty around Russian culpability in the Salisbury incident, questions remain around the state of the available evidence. As contradictory narratives proliferate

Be Sociable, Share!

Russia Suggests UK Possessed Nerve Agent That Is “Quite Artificially” Being Linked to Moscow

Though damning conclusions were quickly drawn and accusatory fingers pointed at Moscow, many unanswered questions swirl around the poisoning: Did the U.K. itself possess the nerve agent used? If not, how did doctors quickly decide what antidotes to administer?

Police officers stand guard at the bottom of the road where former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal lives in Salisbury, England, Tuesday, March 13, 2018. The use of Russian-developed nerve agent Novichok to poison ex-spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter makes it "highly likely" that Russia was involved, British Prime Minister Theresa May said Monday. Novichok refers to a class of nerve agents developed in the Soviet Union near the end of the Cold War. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

LONDON – Russian officials are voicing a full-throated dismissal of British accusations that Russia used a nerve agent referred to as “Novichok” in an attack on former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia. The Russian Ambassador to the U.K., Alexander Yakovenko, is further charging London with making accusations in poor faith, while

Be Sociable, Share!

Britain Is Manufacturing A Nerve Agent Case for ‘Action’ Against Russia

Britain has no real basis to presume Russia was behind the death of Sergey Skripal, but has already decided that it wants to manufacture a path to heightened hostilities with Russia, regardless of the evidence.

Police officers wear protective suits inside the fence of "Ashley Wood Recovery", a vehicle recovery business in Salisbury, England, March 13, 2018. The use of Russian-developed nerve agent Novichok to poison ex-spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter makes it "highly likely" that Russia was involved, British Prime Minister Theresa May claimed. Novichok refers to a class of nerve agents developed in the Soviet Union and possessed by multiple governments. (AP/Matt Dunham)

On Monday, Prime Minister Theresa May announced that former Russian spy, Sergey Skripal and his daughter Yulia, were poisoned with “a military-grade nerve agent of a type developed by Russia” known as ‘Novichok’. The chemical agent was identified by the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory at Porton Down. May referred to the British

Be Sociable, Share!